Where plenty of podcasts about podcasting (PAPs) tell you what to do, Podcast Pontifications gives you what to think about in podcasting. These daily, insightful forward-looking episodes have one central tenet: Podcasting needs to be made better, not just easier. Designed for the working podcaster, these short-form episodes get you thinking about the future of podcasting and how you can better prepare yourself -- and your shows -- for the future. The goal is simple: help you develop critical thinking skills needed to make the best future-proofed podcast you can with the tools of today. Plus a few sneak previews of what might be coming tomorrow. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Podsights - https://podsights.com/privacy

On the whole, podcasting hasn’t been kind to video content producers. And video hasn’t been kind to podcasters’ wallets. But four developing trends could change how podcasters think about video in the future. In the beginning, there were audio podcasts. And then about 13 seconds later there were also video podcasts. But the bifurcation of audio podcasts and video podcasts was relatively short-lived, thanks to Google’s acquisition and promoting the hell out of YouTube.  Since that time, several entrepreneurs have tried to bring video back to podcasting with varying degrees of success, though none deserving of the adjective “breakout”.  But now, forces are converging and video podcasting again could become a thing. Again? Here’s why: Earlier this month, YouTube announced they were looking for an executive to oversee podcasting on their platform. Today, many podcasters are (often crudely) already making video versions of their podcasts and distributing them on YouTube. Just last week, Spotify and Anchor announced they'd soon be hosting audio and video versions of select podcasts in the Spotify app.  Right now, developers in the Podcasting  2.0 movement are developing a way to distribute more than one media file per episode. Like a video and an audio version, doing what Spotify is doing but in a non-propriety manner. And with those moves is Descript, getting us closer to a world where we edit media holistically, rather than editing audio and video separately.  Oh, what a time to be alive. While you’re making your holiday gift guides, you may want to have a serious think on how your show fits in a world where audio and video are both valid options for your listeners. ----- Boostagram Corner Thanks to Garret Godfree and John Kostuch for the coffee. Virtual and physical. Links in the next section. ----- Links: • Getting more than 10K downloads per episode? Talk to https://gumball.fm/?utm_source=sponsorship&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=podpont (Gumball.fm)!  • Happy Tree Friends - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Happy_Tree_Friends • Ask A Ninja - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ask_a_Ninja • YouTube seeks podcast boss - https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-10-05/youtube-looks-to-hire-its-first-executive-focused-on-podcasts • Spotify wants video podcasts - https://blog.anchor.fm/updates/video • Value-for-value for this show - https://podcastpontifications.com/value-4-value • Descript all-in-one platform (affiliate) - h

Far too many podcasters cede control of the narrative of their episodes to their subject. Here’s how to take that power back, make better episodes, and wind up with even more content to share. Lots of podcasters struggle with content creation, especially as deadlines approach. When an episode has to get published, less-than-strategic approaches show themselves in an interview that feels forced or an angle on a topic that seems out of place and quite different in a not-good way to the audience. At the root of these problems of bad fit lies the same problem: the podcaster allowed the subject of the episode to dictate the narrative of the episode.  But you can do a better job than that. A podcaster’s superpower over other media formats is this: Once you know—deeply—what your audience wants, you can shape almost any subject into a narrative that your audience wants to hear. Done right, those crappy, unresearched guest pitches turn into a content fountain! All you have to do is figure out which stories you can pull out guests that your audience wants to hear. You do this by controlling the narrative. Don’t just turn the mic over to your guest and let them run the show. That’s your job! This same approach goes well beyond sorting through unsolicited guest pitches. Because you know your audience and are in charge of the narrative of your episodes, you can build an episode out of almost every trending topic. Content ideas galore!  You're the podcaster. You’re in control of the narrative. You’re in control of your listeners’ experiences. Never forget that. ----- Boostagram Corner Thanks to Casey Broda for a nice episode review. Links in the next section. ----- Links: • Getting more than 10K downloads per episode? Talk to https://gumball.fm/?utm_source=sponsorship&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=podpont (Gumball.fm)!  • Tom Webster - http://twitter.com/webby2001 • Edison Research - https://www.edisonresearch.com • Danny van Leeuwen - https://twitter.com/HealthHats • Health Hats - https://health-hats.com • Bill Risser - https://twitter.com/billrisser • The Real Estate Sessions - https://therealestatesessions.com/ • Keith Bacon - https://twitter.com/madewithbacon • All Ways West Seattle - https://www.allwayspodcast.com • Casey Broda - https://twitter.com/CaseyBroda • Her review on Podchaser - https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/podcast-pontifications-740003/episodes/authentic-podcasting-is-the-be-100070794/reviews/73991 • Value-for-value for this sh

“Just the facts, ma’am,” said no podcast listener ever. Yet, the podcasting directories are filled with niched-down podcasters proclaiming their expertise. Is that what your audience truly wants? Ask yourself: Are you an expert, or are you a guide? A better way to ask that question might be; does your audience want you to be an expert, or do they want you to be a guide?  Yes, there are plenty of examples of podcasts where the audience does in fact want to hear expertise from an expert.  But how often is that? Even for a tightly-niched-down podcast, a good portion of the audience probably wants the podcast host to use their expertise to guide them through the episode.  Here’s a quick litmus test: If you start to answer a question on your podcast and you either say or think the words “Well… it depends” before you give your answer; then it’s a near-certainty that the next words you say will be in the voice of a guide, not an expert.  Guides recognize there's no one right way to present their ideas on their podcast.  Guides recognize they don't have all the answers and therefore can’t share all the answers on their podcast.  Guides recognize the role that serendipity and circumstance play in the lives of their podcast listeners. Lives that might look quite different from their own.  So reflect back on the last few episodes of your show. Is your audience relying on you to tell them what to do? Or are they relying on you and your expertise to guide them? I try very hard to do the latter. But as with all things in life, YMMV. ----- Links: • Getting more than 10K downloads per episode? Talk to https://gumball.fm/?utm_source=sponsorship&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=podpont (Gumball.fm)!  • Monkey River - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monkey_River • Howler monkeys - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guatemalan_black_howler • Value-for-value for this show - https://podcastpontifications.com/value-4-value • Now booking sponsorships for 2022! - https://podcastpontifications.com/sponsor ----- A written-to-be-read article and a full transcript of the audio of this episode can be found at https://podcastpontifications.com/episode/you-can-be-an-expert-on-your-podcast-without-being-a-jerk-about-it. Visit https://twitter.com/evoterra for more podcasting insights from Evo Terra as they come. Return the value-for-value of the podcasting wisdom of this episode and more at https://PodcastPontifications.com/support And if you need a pro

Most successful podcasters don’t make most of their income from their podcast. So why do successful people, from celebs to business leaders, keep investing in their own podcasts? Legitimacy and access. For every successful podcaster I know who makes most, if not all, of their income directly from their podcast, I know a hundred more successful podcasters who see very little direct income from their podcast. Yet each and every one of the successful podcasters I know credits their podcast as being instrumental to their ongoing success. Let's not forget the tangible benefits running a successful podcast brings to your podcast. Tangible benefits that are oftentimes better and more lucrative for you in the long term. A well-produced podcast is significantly better than a one-sheet at communicating your goals.  A well-produced podcast can be better than a headshot at conveying your talents.  A well-produced podcast showcases that thing you do much better than a 6-minute explainer video. And even though I’m an author, I think that a well-produced podcast is much better than a book at demonstrating your knowledge in a particular area. One of the biggest powers of a well-produced podcast is the outsized legitimacy it provides. That legitimacy opens up doors to you that other people who do not have an established, respected, and well-produced podcast may find difficult to get through.  Those tangible benefits are often much more valuable to you and to your total income possibilities than any small ad campaign, affiliate deal, or whatever bundled service offering you were pitched just this week.  ----- Boostagram Corner Thanks to Suzy Buttress for the virtual coffee! Links in the next section. ----- Links: • Getting more than 10K downloads per episode? Talk to https://gumball.fm/?utm_source=sponsorship&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=podpont (Gumball.fm)!  • Suzy Buttress - https://www.instagram.com/suzybee_2 • The Casual Birder podcast - https://casualbirder.com • Value-for-value for this show - https://podcastpontifications.com/value-4-value • Now booking sponsorships for 2022! - https://podcastpontifications.com/sponsor ----- A written-to-be-read article and a full transcript of the audio of this episode can be found at https://podcastpontifications.com/episode/moving-past-the-full-time-podcast-income-fallacy. Visit https://twitter.com/evoterra for more podcasting insights from Evo Terra as they come. Return the value-for-value of the

Worrying about growth, new tech, and other podcasting distractions can cause you to forget that your audience is your audience, not a nameless pool you have to fight for week after week. Lean into them. I'm not a big fan of the word authentic. It’s become overused and often used incorrectly. But there’s one place where I’ve no issue with hearing the word, and that’s when talking about your authentic self.  I’m incapable of being anything other than my authentic self for more than a dozen minutes. But that may not be you. Regardless of how much you can let your authentic self shine through during your waking hours, I hope you are able to be your authentic self on your podcast.  While listening to a conversation https://www.cameronesposito.com/ (Cameron Esposito) was having with https://twitter.com/jesskupferman (Jessica Kupferman) at https://www.shepodcasts.com/live/ (She Podcasts LIVE) over the weekend, I jotted this note: Your audience is your audience. It's okay to talk about things that only your audience cares about. The masses don't matter.  Now, I think that's an incredibly grounded perspective for any podcaster to take and reflect on from time to time. Your audience is your audience. Those five words can work as a re-centering mantra when you need it. Saying them out loud can, when needed, help you reconnect with your show, which in turn will help you reconnect with your audience. Again, when you need to. It's very easy to get caught up in the desire to grow your podcast. And yes, I think that growing a show is important. To some degree, growth is at least somewhat important to most podcasters. How important is debatable, obviously. But if your quest to grow your show drives you too far away from the content your authentic self cares about, then you may see the opposite of growth. To thine own self be true. That's why your audience is listening to your podcast in the first place.  ----- Boostagram Corner Thanks to Doug Berger for the virtual coffee! Links in the next section. ----- Links: • Getting more than 10K downloads per episode? Talk to https://gumball.fm/?utm_source=sponsorship&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=podpont (Gumball.fm)!  • Cameron Esposito - https://www.cameronesposito.com • She Podcast LIVE - https://www.shepodcasts.com/live • Suzy Buttress - https://www.instagram.com/suzybee_2 • The Casual Birder podcast - https://casualbirder.com • Doug Berger - https://www.dougberger.net • Glass City Humanist - htt

Conflicting advice plagues podcasters. Be yourself, but also follow this exact format, or you won’t have a successful show. Resolving that conflict isn’t easy. But it starts by trusting your talents.  Society whispers at us all the time... no one likes a showoff.  At the risk of offending my late grandmother who was the physical embodiment of that notion, that doesn't really cut it in podcasting.  Today, I'm going to ask a challenging question for you to ponder over the weekend: Are you showcasing your talents on your podcast? I'm constantly surprised how often this isn't the case, with podcasters credulously following a format or playbook that was developed by someone else, ostensibly to be more successful more quickly.  Let me turn my question into a statement: Don't be afraid to showcase your talents as you podcast.  Unless you are the Übermensch, you are better at some skills over others. Maybe is a natural talent. Or maybe you trained hard to become good. Lean into it!  I suck at interviewing because I’m not a good listener. But I’m a good researcher, so I can come up with weird questions that make for interesting answers, in the rare instance when I do an interview.  So what’s your skill? And how can you lean into it? Do you have an infectious laugh? Let it out! Are you a talented musician? Think about scoring your episodes.  Showcasing your own talents is a much more likely pathway to success than following some arbitrary plan or format that someone else gave you. Especially if thousands of other people are following that same “proven” playbook. There's nothing special about that.  But there is something special about your show. And that's you. So showcase that! ----- Links: • Getting more than 10K downloads per episode? Talk to https://gumball.fm/?utm_source=sponsorship&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=podpont (Gumball.fm)!  • She Podcast LIVE - https://www.shepodcasts.com/live/ • Value-for-value for this show - https://podcastpontifications.com/value-4-value • Now booking sponsorships for 2022! - https://podcastpontifications.com/sponsor ----- A written-to-be-read article and a full transcript of the audio of this episode can be found at https://podcastpontifications.com/episode/dont-be-afraid-to-showcase-your-podcasting-talents. Visit https://twitter.com/evoterra for more podcasting insights from Evo Terra as they come. Return the value-for-value of the podcasting wisdom of this episode and mo

Some once-exclusive podcasters are challenging the notion that you can never go home again. They assume their audience will be happy to see them. But reality may not line up with those assumptions. Podcasters who’ve gone exclusive do the calculus on moving back to free and wide distribution by making three assumptions. Assumptions that could do with some challenging. Assumption #1: My existing listeners will keep listening when the podcast is no longer exclusive. Yes, I think that assumption is largely true. But what if the exclusive app you left is only for exclusive podcasts? Or you burned a bridge your podcast is no longer be welcome there? And what if the listener’s experience is truly better on that platform?  Assumption #2: The listeners I lost when I went exclusive will love to have my podcast back. Are you sure about that? Some grudges run deep and are hard to get over. And every lost listener found other content and hosts to fill the void left by your podcast. Because people move on. 3rd Assumption: Wider distribution + loyal fans + the fans who returned = larger audience. The math checks out on that, but the big question is: larger audience than when? There’s a very good chance you lost a lot when your podcast went exclusive. And a lot of your old fans won’t return. You may have to learn a new hustle game. I’m not opposed to shows deciding to take the exclusive route if that is the right opportunity for them. Just be sure you’ve thought through what happens when the exclusivity is over. The game may have changed while you were away. ----- Links: • Getting more than 10K downloads per episode? Talk to https://gumball.fm/?utm_source=sponsorship&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=podpont (Gumball.fm)!  • She Podcast LIVE - https://www.shepodcasts.com/live/ • Value-for-value for this show - https://podcastpontifications.com/value-4-value • Now booking sponsorships for 2022! - https://podcastpontifications.com/sponsor ----- A written-to-be-read article and a full transcript of the audio of this episode can be found at https://podcastpontifications.com/episode/from-free-podcast-to-exclusive-podcast-back-again. Visit https://twitter.com/evoterra for more podcasting insights from Evo Terra as they come. Return the value-for-value of the podcasting wisdom of this episode and more at https://PodcastPontifications.com/support And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit https://Simpler.Media to see how Simpler Media Prod

You can’t judge a book by its cover. But our podcasts are judged by a single episode—our most recent. It’d be better if we were judged by a collection of our best episodes. But how would we do that? There are a number of untapped opportunities for podcasters—and podcasting—if we knew the relative popularity of podcast episodes. Here are three quick ones:  A “Start Here” collection for new listeners. What better way to ensure new listeners have a great experience than letting them first listen to your greatest hits? Better-deserved podcast awards. A single episode isn’t enough to determine if a podcast is award-worthy. But a collection of episodes would make for much more informed decisions. Better experience in podcast listening apps. Present that “Start here” concept to new subscribers. And if they consume all of those episodes, auto-subscribe the listener to the full show. But back to my question; how do we know which episodes are popular?  Do we base on downloads? Meh. It’s a start. And some forward-thinking podcasting peeps are on that case already. Data from listening apps would be much better, using things like play-thru, multiple-plays, time-to-consume, and other human-based interactions. Or inbound link data. Data-normalization issues aside, perhaps an existing social monitoring service would be interested in doing something like this for podcasts?  I wonder what I missed? And If you're a podcast service provider. I'd love to know what you think you could do with “popularity” data and how that would make your podcasting service better.  ----- Links: • Getting more than 10K downloads per episode? Talk to https://gumball.fm/?utm_source=sponsorship&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=podpont (Gumball.fm)!  • Twitter thead by forward-thinking podcast providers - https://twitter.com/podcastharry/status/1447307179808149504 • What did I miss? Email me at evo@simpler.media • Value-for-value for this show - https://podcastpontifications.com/value-4-value • Now booking sponsorships for 2022! - https://podcastpontifications.com/sponsor ----- A written-to-be-read article and a full transcript of the audio of this episode can be found at https://podcastpontifications.com/episode/showcasing-the-best-episodes-of-your-podcast. Visit https://twitter.com/evoterra for more podcasting insights from Evo Terra as they come. Return the value-for-value of the podcasting wisdom of this episode and more at https://PodcastPontifications.com/support

Consistently releasing episodes on a set schedule is a good idea to keep your overall audience happy. But that doesn’t mean that every individual listener is listening to every individual episode. Is that OK? Last week, I didn't get to listen to any new episodes of any podcasts. Why? Because I was exploring the jungles and beaches of Belize, that’s why!  After six days of neglect and on the ride home, I started listening again. But I didn’t start at the top of my listening queue. Not with a backlog that large.  I chose to catch up on two serialized podcasts I’m listening to more or less in time with the show’s release schedule. Then I listened to the latest episodes from only three different podcasts out of that backlog. And then we landed. Will I go back and listen to all the non-serialized podcast episodes I missed? No, I probably won’t. Even though I genuinely enjoy those podcasts. Because I know that those shows will soon release a new episode, probably this week, which will let me get my fix. Without having to go back and listen to what they published that I missed. In a similar vein, I texted a podcasting friend a week or so ago with a great idea for an episode of their show. A show of which I’m a huge fan. Their response? “I did that a month or so ago”.  Oops. I missed it. So did I go back and listen to that previously produced episode which was on the very topic I wanted to hear? No, I did not.  This happens a lot. A lot more than we probably want to admit to ourselves.  No one can ensure that every episode of your show will be listened to by every one of your listeners.  My advice? Don’t sweat it. And also don't assume that every one of your subscribers hangs on your every word. Some do, for sure. But many more do not.  ----- Boostagram Corner: Thanks to Steve Stewart, Coach JD, Biray Seitz, and Gary Arndt for their support! Links in the next section.  ----- Links: • Getting more than 10K downloads per episode? Talk to https://gumball.fm/?utm_source=sponsorship&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=podpont (Gumball.fm)!  • Steve Stewart - https://twitter.com/SteveStewartMe • Podcast Editing For Busy Podcasters - https://stevestewart.me • Coach JD - https://twitter.com/jd_thejedi • Health Talks With JD - https://www.veritasfit.com/podcast • Biray Seitz - https://twitter.com/Befitt • Gary Arndt - https://twitter.com/EverywhereTrip • Everything Everywhere - https://everything-everywhere.com • Fountain - htt

There are those who would have podcasters believe that they have to grind out episodes, day after day, week after week, month after month, and never take a break. I am not one of those. ‘Cuz that’s dumb. If you’re a brand new or an infrequent listener, this episode is going to sound unusual.  I’m not producing episodes this week because I’m on vacation, exploring some of the beaches of Belize in Central America, and enjoying the warm Caribbean ocean right outside my hotel room. But I promise to you that I shall be back on Monday, October the 11th, 2021 with yet another Podcast Pontifications.  ----- Links: • Running ads on your podcast? Talk to Gumball! - https://gumball.fm/?utm_source=sponsorship&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=podpont • Value-for-value for this show - https://podcastpontifications.com/value-4-value • Now booking sponsorships for 2022! - https://podcastpontifications.com/sponsor ----- A written-to-be-read article and a full transcript of the audio of this episode can be found at https://podcastpontifications.com/episode/blame-the-beach-for-this-interruption. Visit https://twitter.com/evoterra for more podcasting insights from Evo Terra as they come. Return the value-for-value of the podcasting wisdom of this episode and more at https://PodcastPontifications.com/value-4-value And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit https://Simpler.Media to see how Simpler Media Productions can help you reach your business objectives with podcasting. Allie Press assists with the production and transcription of the show. Learn more about Allie at http://alliepress.net. Podcast Pontifications four times a week to provide ideas and ask questions every working podcaster should be thinking about. Subscribe/follow today at https://PodcastPontifications.com. Photo by https://unsplash.com/@merittthomas?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText (Meritt Thomas) on https://unsplash.com/s/photos/belize?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText (Unsplash) This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Podsights - https://podsights.com/privacy Support this podcast

It’s International Podcast Day! A day when podcasters around the globe celebrate their craft and their journey, regardless if they’ve been podcasting for 17 days or 17 years. Speaking of that last one… I’m going to break down the +17-year journey of one podcaster—me!—if only to prove that, for many of us, podcasting is quite a tangled path. My official entrance to podcasting started in October of 2004 with The Dragon Page. Soon after that we launched Slice of Scif, followed quickly by Wingin’ It. After adding a podcast we didn’t host called The Dragon Page With Class to our roster, we launched the first scifi podcast network called FarPoint Media. And it was still 2005! Parallel to all of that, I personally started working with authors to help them podcast, soon creating a network of “podiobooks”, a portmanteau of podcasting and audiobooks, if that wasn’t obvious. Tha directly led to me co-authoring Podcasting For Dummies and Expert Podcasting Practices For Dummies.  parting ways with FarPoint Media in mid-2007, I launched two short-lived podcasts: Cult Cast and Found Things. You’re better for not hearing either of them. And because I sometimes bet on the wrong trends, I also co-hosted Palm Fu, a podcast all about the Palm Pre smartphone, plus a podcast build on Google+ called The Books & Beer Hangout. You pays your money and you takes your chances. Some time in there, I decided the world needed more me so I did a limited run podcast called Evo at 11. A show that I’m very, very glad I pulled after 100 episodes. Apparently, I can be an asshole behind the mic. Who knew? (Kidding. I knew.)  Then my wife and I left the country, using a podcast to document our travels around the world. Then I found out it’s a lot of work to produce a journalistic style podcast. But those travels led me to living in Bangkok where I became the co-host of the 2nd season of The Bangkok Podcast.  And Bangkok is where my podcast consultancy, Simpler Media, was born. I’ve been back in The States since 2018, and podcasting is very much what I do. Not just with Podcast Pontifications, but I also do some hired-gun hosting for RadioMD, am the editor for Sounds Profitable, and sit on the advisory board for Captivate.fm, Maps,fm, Scrib, and a few others. My wish for you on International Podcast Days is that your podcasting journey be as varied and rewarding as mine. Cheers! ----- Boostagram Corner: Thank you, Dave Jackson, for the sats boost! Links in the next section.&nb

Podcasting is easy. For like five minutes. Then reality sets in. The reality of making great content that people can’t help but share. Podcasting doesn’t come with guarantees. So is it worth it? Chat with me about growth marketing for podcasts, and it won’t be long before I utter the phrase “Podcasts tend to get the audience they deserve.” Those eight words have become part mantra, part axiom for me. Because they do accurately represent my overarching worldview of podcasting.  My axiom has nothing to do with your worth and everything to do with the product you produce. Is it just good or is it great? Are the conversations interesting or are they incredibly compelling? Do all the parts kinda work together, or was it packaged with the utmost care? Does your podcast fit neatly in the lives of your audience? Did you choose your length to do just that, or for some other reason? Are you giving them the perfect amount of new content? And do they like the host, or are they bordering on fanaticism? The operative word that brings this whole axiom together is tend: “podcasts tend to get the audience they deserve”. Tend means that neither success nor failure of any given podcast is a foregone conclusion. Tend allows for external pressures and serendipitous events that live outside your control.  Does your podcast deserve a bigger audience? That’s a decision that lies in the relationship between your podcast and your audience. But I stand by my axiom: Podcasts tend to get the audience they deserve. You can try to buck the trend, sure. Or you can examine the relationship between your podcast and your audience and adjust accordingly. ----- Boostagram Corner: Thank you, Dave Hanley from AdvertiseCast, for the virtual coffee. Links in the next section.  ----- Links: • FREE 3-week trial of My Podcast Reviews - https://mypodcastreviews.com/pp • Dave Hanley (Twitter) - https://twitter.com/dwa_hanley • AdvertiseCast - https://www.advertisecast.com • Value-for-value for this show - https://podcastpontifications.com/value-4-value • Now booking sponsorships for 2022! - https://podcastpontifications.com/sponsor ----- A written-to-be-read article and a full transcript of the audio of this episode can be found at https://podcastpontifications.com/episode/podcasts-tend-to-get-the-audience-they-deserve. Visit https://twitter.com/evoterra for more podcasting insights from Evo Terra as they come. Return the value-for-value of the podcasting wisdom of this episode and more

It’s hard to predict which podcaster will be successful. But it’s fairly easy to see who won’t make it for long just by looking at their actions. Or inactions. Here are some of their bad habits for you to avoid. Not all of the podcasting habits you develop as you get in your groove are good. In fact, bad podcasters tend to accumulate a collection of bad habits. Bad habits you (and I) would do well to avoid. With that... Bad podcasters don’t listen to their own shows. Yes, you might have spent four, 40, or 400 hours in production. But if you aren’t listening to the finalized audio proof as if you were a listener… you’re missing things!  Bad podcasters don't respond to their listeners. No one owes you anything for making your podcast. So when a listener takes the time to say nice things—publicly or privately—You owe that to them to respond in kind. Bad podcasters invest more in gear than they do content. Yes, the quality of the audio you produce is super important, and better gear might get you there. But it's not nearly as important as your ability to tell great and compelling stories on a consistent basis.  Bad podcasters have production schedules that mirror their release schedules. Get ahead. Like, really ahead. Weeks or months if possible. Yes, I’m calling myself out on this one. It's very likely that you, like me, currently have one or more of these bad habits. That doesn’t necessarily make you a bad podcaster. Heck, even having all of these bad habits doesn’t necessarily make you a bad podcaster. But if you can break those bad habits in favor of better ones, how much better could you and your podcast be? ----- Boostagram Corner: Thank you, Matt Mederios, of podcast Matt Reports and of Castos, for the Twitter boost. Links in the next section.  ----- Links: • FREE 3-week trial of My Podcast Reviews - https://mypodcastreviews.com/pp • Parkinson’s law - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parkinson%27s_law • Matt Mederios (Twitter) - https://twitter.com/mattmedeiros • Matt Report - https://mattreport.com • Castos - https://castos.com • Value-for-value for this show - https://podcastpontifications.com/support • Want to sponsor Podcast Pontifications? - https://podcastpontifications.com/sponsor ----- A written-to-be-read article and a full transcript of the audio of this episode can be found at https://podcastpontifications.com/episode/avoid-these-4-bad-habits-of-bad-podcasters. Visit https://twitter.com/evoterra for more podcasting insights from E

Micropayments have been touted as the next big revenue source for podcasters since the beginning without much success. But could changes by social media finally herald in our money-flowing future? You let your listeners listen on whatever listening app they want, don’t you? You let your listeners reach out to you on lots of different communication channels, don’t you?  So as a smart and savvy podcaster, you’ll take that same attitude for receiving direct payments from your listeners, won’t you? Not long ago, podcasters picked a listener-support platform and drove their listeners to that podcaster-chosen platform. But Twitter just flipped that cart upside down and announced that direct payments would be integrated into the social platform. With a few clicks—and never leaving Twitter—your listeners can send you funds directly from Twitter. And it’s a safe bet other social platforms will quickly follow. And that has a lot of implications for all podcasters to consider. Here are a few I’m thinking of at the moment: 1st, there’s going to be a wave of buzz around this, and it’s important that you’re able to be funded. So go through the process as soon as you can.  2nd, The direct-payments and crowd-funding industries aren’t going to take this sitting down. I don’t think it’s too crazy to see funding platforms allowing creators to publish content directly to the platform 3rd, to quote the noted economist https://clip.cafe/snatch-2000/this-will-get-messy/ (Gorgeous George; this will get messy). Some apps/services will do a better job of integration than others. Hopefully, we don’t slide into the chasm that is the Tyranny of Choice.  So my advice: get there, hold on, and see what happens. Let’s embrace the concept of letting our listeners provide value back to us on their terms. ----- Boostagram Corner: Thank you, Kyle Hebert of The Intergalactic Boom Box Podcast, for the Twitter boost. Links in the next section.  ----- Links: • FREE 3-week trial of My Podcast Reviews - https://mypodcastreviews.com/pp • Twitter announces direct payment methods - https://blog.twitter.com/en_us/topics/product/2021/bringing-tips-to-everyone • Noted economist Gorgeous George: https://clip.cafe/snatch-2000/this-will-get-messy/ • Kyle Hebert (Twitter) - http://Twitter.cin/kylehebert • The Intergalactic Boom Box Podcast - https://www.podpage.com/the-intergalactic-boom-box/ • New support page is updated! - https://podcastpontifications.com/support • Want to sponsor Podc

It’s true that it’s cheap to start a podcast. It’s also true that the best podcasters don’t often podcast on the cheap. Getting serious about podcasting means selecting serious podcasting tools and services. As is the case with most other creative pursuits; podcasters have options to use a better suite of tools and services that allow them to save time and—in the long run—money by letting them focus more on mastering the craft of podcasting. To that end, I offer you five upgrade paths for tools and services used by serious podcasters. 1. Upgrade to a serious DAW. Yes, I know you can do everything you currently need to do for your podcast with the free digital audio workstation (DAW) that you're using. But I assure you there are a great number of options, efficiencies, and enhancements you've not been exposed to because of your continued use of the tool that came on your computer or the one you downloaded for free. 2. Clean your audio before adding it to your DAW. It may sound, to you, that pre-cleaning audio instead of letting your DAW’s plugins is a needless step. But done right, doing pre-clean will sound, to your listeners, like an essential step. 3. Improve your recording environment. Acoustically treating the space you use the most to record and getting rid of those cheap, noisy mic cables can make a huge difference that your audience will hear.  4. Pick a centralized communication, coordination, and collaboration service. Your Rube Goldberg-esque system using Dropbox, Google Docs, Slack, WhatsApp, Messenger, and email can only be pushed so far. 5. Start outsourcing. No, not your audio editing. Start by getting a trusted assistant to do every rote task, and then consider investing in a pro to master every episode before it’s published. Both allow you to be that much better. ----- Links: • FREE 3-week trial of My Podcast Reviews - https://mypodcastreviews.com/pp • Hindenburg Journalist Pro (DAW) - https://hindenburg.com/products/hindenburg-journalist-pro •  Adobe Audition (DAW) - https://www.adobe.com/products/audition/free-trial-download.html • Reaper (DAW) - https://www.reaper.fm  • Logic Pro (DAW) - https://www.apple.com/logic-pro • Pro Tools (DAW) - https://www.avid.com/pro-tools • iZotope (cleanup) - https://www.izotope.com • Accusonus (cleanup) - https://accusonus.com • Waves (cleanup) - https://www.waves.com • Audimute (sound conditioning) - https://www.audimute.com • KOPUL (mic cables) - http://www.kopulcables.com • Mogami (mic c

Starting a podcast is easy. But becoming better by following self-serve, learn-at-your-own-pace materials will only get you so far. Sometimes, you need a specialized curriculum to make you a better podcaster. Writing Podcasting for Dummies back in 2005 taught me to love podcasting. Writing Expert Podcasting Practices for Dummies a few years later almost made me hate it. Why? Because the journey to becoming a better podcaster is a thousand or more different paths, each winding in, out, and around the others. Anyone selling you a master class on podcasting is probably only offering a master class in how they podcast. So today, I'm going to break down six—yes, only six—educational resources designed for seasoned podcasters to up their game 1. Take a Transom.org Workshop. Transom’s goal is to make you the best storyteller you can be. But fair warning, these educational programs, like many good educational programs, are not inexpensive.   2. Read Out On The Wire, by Jessica Abel, a timeless book I think every serious podcaster should have in their head as well as on their bookshelf. But it’s not a book filled with worksheets and actionable takeaways. Instead, it’s about the process of making great audio.  3. Get NPR-level training from NPR. They’ve packaged up a wide range of incredibly insightful resources that podcasters can consume. It's a huge treasure trove of information that’s worth regular visits to see what new information they’ve made available to all of us podcasters.  4. Up your podcast marketing with Polymash if you’re looking for higher-level marketing and optimization strategies specific to podcasting.  5. Get Better With Other Podcasters In The Podcast Academy. I’m excited to see a shift in focus this year to mentorship groups where seasoned podcasters meet and collaborate on a regular basis, allowing each small group to evolve in its own way that serves the needs of in each small group.  6. Get specialized audio training from The Podcast Audio Lab. Coming very soon, Marcus dePaula will offer short, highly focused training videos designed to solve very specific audio/recording challenges faced by more advanced podcasters. If I missed your favorite resource (which is bound to happen), please share your thoughts in the Advancing Podcasting community with a hundred or so other seasoned podcasters who want to get better at the craft of podcasting. ----- Links: • FREE 3-week trial of My Podcast Reviews - https://mypodcas

Where does the serious podcaster go when seeking to up their game? The web is lousy with “how to get started in podcasting” resources. Fortunately, there are also some great next-level resources. Here are five: 1. Podnews - The aim of the publication is not to make you a better podcaster. Instead, it’s designed to update you on the latest podcast news. Which, I’d argue, is an important thing for serious podcasters to do. Being informed across a large cross-section of our industry is important to any podcaster wishing to up their own game.  2. Sounds Profitable - Even if you don’t care about podcast advertising, you need to read what Bryan Barletta has to say every week. True, the focus of Sounds Profitable is podcast ad tech. But podcast ad tech is becoming podcast tech. Consider podcast ad tech as the canary in the coal mine, if you like. 3. Hot Pod - Hot Pod has been a staple of podcasting for several years and was founded to cover how the larger players—big media organizations and large production houses, mostly— are finding success with podcasting. Serious podcasting, one might say, instead of hobbyist podcasting.  4. HowSound - HowSound is a podcast that showcases the best in audio storytelling. Each episode helps you understand the why as much as the how behind stories that work really, really well in audio, leaving you with plenty of great nuggets to apply as you kick your podcast up a notch or two.  5. Podcast Pulse - A Twitter list of 100+ Twitter accounts that frequently post excellent content to help any podcaster improve their skills. Follow the list to see what the current podcast Twitter zeitgeist is bubbling with. ----- Links: • FREE 3-week trial of My Podcast Reviews - https://mypodcastreviews.com/pp • Podnews -https://podnews.net • Sounds Profitable - https://soundsprofitable.com • Hot Pod - https://hotpodnews.com • HowSound - https://transom.org/topics/howsound • Podcast Pulse - https://twitter.com/i/lists/1091683091872010240 • Advancing Podcasting community - http://advancingpodcasting.xyz • Email me - evo@simpler.media • New support page in progress - https://podcastpontifications.com/support • Want to sponsor Podcast Pontifications? - https://podcastpontifications.com/sponsor ----- A written-to-be-read article and a full transcript of the audio of this episode can be found at https://podcastpontifications.com/episode/5-resources-to-help-you-think-like-a-serious-podcaster. Visit https://twitter.com/evoterra for more podca

Who better to inspire fledgling podcasters than a podcaster at the top of their game! But for seasoned podcasters who want to get better, the value of playing follow the leader can quickly fade. Many podcasters want to get better at podcasting. The fact that you're reading this article or have listened to the accompanying audio episode is a strong indicator that you want to get better at podcasting. And if you are actively engaging with the http://advancingpodcasting.xyz/ (Advancing Podcasting community on Discord), it’s a near-certainty that you wish to get better at podcasting. Learning from the best in our craft seems logical. But in fact, history is littered with examples of why that’s often a terrible idea. Wayne Gretzky, arguably the greatest NHL player to ever lace up the skates, wasn’t a good coach, losing more games than he won in four years.  Stephen King's book On Writing is a memoir, not a “how-to-write-books-the-way-Stephen-King-writes-books” book Yngwie Malmsteen cannot, in fact, teach how to shred just like Yngwie Malmsteen. Working actors tend not to flock to masterclasses taught by actors with multiple academy awards on their mantle.  That’s because, generally speaking, these pro-created curriculum target beginners or those who just want to dabble. Those looking for shortcuts to make them feel like they’re better than they were before. And there’s nothing wrong with that. But those resources are for dabblers and beginners providing marginal improvements without imparting any of the stepping stones that lead to further improvements. And that’s all the beginner or dabbler typically wants. But for podcasters wanting to get serious about their career, the educational bits aimed at beginners are of little value. Especially when the podcasting pro you want to learn from is putting out 101-level content.  So where are, exactly, the resources that help serious podcasters get better? How do we get the information we need to keep improving our craft so that we too can someday reach the top of our game? I’d love to hear what you’ve personally found helpful to move you to the next level. And I’ll have a few to share with you for the rest of this week. ----- Links: • FREE 3-week trial of My Podcast Reviews - https://mypodcastreviews.com/pp • Join the free Advancing Podcasting community - https://advancingpodcasting.xyz • Email me - evo@simpler.media • New support page in progress - https://podcastpontifications.com/support • Want to spon

As interest in podcasting heats up, networks new and old are reaching out to podcasters to make it a group effort. Joining a network may be right for your podcast, but consider these five must-haves before you sign. A quick caveat before I start: Podcasters join networks for lots of reasons. Podcast networks exist for lots of reasons. Keep that in mind if anything I say below doesn’t sit squarely in the box you’ve defined for the podcast network of which you’re a part, OK? I’ve personally managed two moderately successful podcast networks, and I’ve consulted with many other podcast networks on a variety of strategic and operational capacities. It’s from those experiences I derive the following “must-haves” before joining a podcast network. But with all things in life, YMMV. 1. You should be able to walk away from the network. If the network isn’t living up to your expectations, you shouldn’t be stuck. Once you’ve fulfilled your obligations, you should be able to disengage. 2. You should own your own content. Who owns episodes made while on a network can be a little fuzzy, so make sure there aren’t any entanglements that cause you to give up more ownership than you want. 3. Continuity for the show’s audience is paramount. When the dust settles, 301 redirects should be in place and kept in place. Not screwing over the audience is in both party’s best interests.  4. You should get a guaranteed minimum payment each month. It’s not your fault if the ad sales team for the network is bad at their job. The network should want to make sure you don’t take your podcast-shaped ball and go home. 5. You should get a share of the network’s profits. If the rising tide lifts all boats, your boat and every other boat in the harbor should get a piece of the overall action, not just your own contribution.  If you’re on (or own) a network that hits all of these marks (and then some), let me know about it. I’d love to sing their praises, as I get asked about joining podcast networks several times a week. I’m happy to refer good podcasters to good podcast networks. ----- Links: • FREE 3-week trial of My Podcast Reviews - https://mypodcastreviews.com/pp • Email me - evo@simpler.media • New podcast apps - https://newpodcastapps.com • New support page in progress - https://podcastpontifications.com/support • Want to sponsor Podcast Pontifications? - https://podcastpontifications.com/sponsor ----- A written-to-be-read article and a full transcript of the audio of this epis

What’s great about podcasting is that not everyone has to get you or your podcast. That was one of the great things about Norm MacDonald, a comedian from whom podcasters can learn a thing or three. It’s been said that when people want to laugh, they watch a comedian. But when comedians want to laugh, they watch Norm MacDonald. Norm was, by all accounts, a comedian’s comedian. I rather like the idea of being known as a podcaster’s podcaster.  So with that, here are three lessons podcasters can learn from the life of comedian Norm MacDonald. First, know what aspects of podcasting you are really good at.  There were plenty of aspects of comedy Norm didn’t care for, so he didn’t master them. Be did master the mechanics and fundamentals of comedy.  Podcasting is already at a point where you can choose to specialize in particular areas of podcasting. Just make sure you also get really good at fundamentals and the mechanics of what makes podcasting work. Second, surround yourself with other podcasters who are really good at podcasting Norm traveled in an elite circle of comedic greats who weren’t always the most in-demand comedians of the day. But they were great at their craft. Who do you admire and respect in podcasting, who feels the same way about the craft of podcasting that you feel about the craft of podcasting? And if you’re not already, how can you become pals with them?  Third, don’t try to please the audience. Arguably the most counterintuitive podcasting advice you’ve heard all day, but that’s Norm for you. Norm absolutely knew who he was for and why they were there. And he didn’t care much about those in attendance who he was not for, regardless of why they were there.  It takes an extreme amount of confidence to know that in the audience are just the people who grok you.  Thanks for the laughs, Norm. ----- Links: • FREE 3-week trial of My Podcast Reviews -  https://mypodcastreviews.com/pp • Norm MacDonald, dead at 61 - https://variety.com/2021/tv/news/norm-macdonald-dead-dies-snl-1235064570 • Tom Webster on Twitter - http://twitter.com/webby2001 • Edison Research - https://www.edisonresearch.com • Prior episode on knowing who you are for and why they are there - https://podcastpontifications.com/episode/the-surprising-delightful-way-to-grow-your-podcast • Support Evo by buying him a virtual coffee - https://buymeacoffee.com/evoterra • Want to sponsor Podcast Pontifications? - https://podcastpontifications.com/spons