Malicious Life
Cybereason
Malicious Life by Cybereason tells the unknown stories of the history of cybersecurity, with comments and reflections by real hackers, security experts, journalists, and politicians.
On November 22nd, 1987, a hacker took over the signals of two Chicago-area TV stations and broadcast two bizarre and somewhat vulgar messages. In this episode we explore this notorious hack, and its implications on the nature of hacking in general.

The fact that ToTok came out of the United Arab Emirates is no surprise: in recent years, the UAE has deployed some of the most sophisticated mobile device exploits ever seen. But they got a lot of help from one country in particular... today’s episode is about the UAE. But it’s really about the Americans.

An episode from Darknet Diaries! The story of how the US cyber command attacked ISIS - as told by the commander of that mission. An extremely rare peak at the inner working of the US cyber command!

The corporate structure supporting ToTok involved at least half a dozen real companies, shell companies and intelligence groups, with the individuals who actually operated the app being hidden behind other individuals given sinecure jobs and ponied around to the public as the supposed developers. Ultimately, though, every path that begins with ToTok ends with one very rich and powerful man at the heart of the Emirati state. His name is Sheikh Tahnoon bin Zayed al-Nahyan.

Only a few months after its release, ToTok - an ordinary messaging app, with no exceptional features - had over five million downloads, and held the number 4 position in Apple's App Store global charts. So what was it that made ToTok so popular, so quickly? The answer: nothing good.

As much as we can imagine what it’s like to be a defender in a cyber-conflict, we don’t really know what it is - unless we’re in the shoes the time of it happening. That's what simulations are for.

Banks & other financial institutions face a variety of security threats: from state-sponsored cyber-attacks, to smaller acts of fraud, to thousands of random malware attacks from the web. To survive in this hostile landscape, these organizations turned to the military for inspiration.

Petro Rabigh were facing lots of problems in defending their systems. But they did get lucky in one sense: their hackers were unprepared when their plan went awry. Who were the hackers that infiltrated the Saudi petrochemical plant, and what can this breach teach us?

Industrial Security requires a different skill set--really, an entirely different mindset than working in IT does. In this episode we dive into the story of one of the most dangerous malware ever to be discovered in the wild: Triton/Trisis.

Deep Fakes are set to revolutionize content creation, but alongside this technology's benefits, it also has the potential two sow havoc, fear, and distrust via Social Networks. Just this week, Facebook disclosed a network of fake users it found, whose profile images were all deep faked. So, how can we identify deep fakes - even before they go online?

Over the past two years, the internet has been inundated with celebrity Deep Fake videos of all kinds: Obama, Putin, and Trump deliver speeches they never gave, Gal Gadot "stars” in a porn video, and professional comedians such as Bill Hader eerily turn into the people they impersonate, like Tom Cruise and Arnold Schwarzenegger. What all of these videos have in common is that they were mostly created by amateur developers or small startups with tight budgets - but their quality is surprisingly good, and in some cases as good as what the biggest movie studios were able to produce with huge budgets just a few years ago. So what happened in the last five years, that turned special effects from being the exclusive domain of industry experts - into something a 14-year-old can create more or less at the touch of a button? Like the top end of a floating glacier, Deep Fakes are by and large only the visible product of a fascinating - and much deeper - technological revolution in the field of artificial intelligence. As we shall soon see, this revolution has the potential to put some very powerful tools in the hands of both attackers and defenders in the world of cyber-security.

Sam Curry is Cybereason's Chief Security Officer and an award-winning cyber security visionary. Sam & Ran discuss Sam's upcoming webinar, in which he will present his insights into what 2020 will bring for the security industry: the rise of 5G cellular networks, The US Presidential Elections, the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and more.

Even the best hackers are human, and humans are inescapably unique. Forensic Linguistics, Behavioral Signatures and Cultural Captchas can help defenders identify and (maybe) catch even the best of hackers.

Thousands of companies are losing millions of dollars to cyber attacks. An insurance seems an ideal solution to their woes - yet this kind of insurance is much less common today, than it should be. What's the problem with Cyber insurance?

Nate Nelson speaks with Amit Serper & Sam Curry, notable veteran in Cyber Security, about Malware-As-A-Service, bullet-proof hosting, avoiding the lure of the 'dark side' and more.

In 2010, Nikita Kuzmin returned to the malware scene with Gozi 2.0, an improved version of the successful banking Trojan. How did Gozi 2.0 fair against Zeus & the new generation of Trojans, and what can we learn from Nikita's story about how does one become a malicious hacker in the first place?

In this out-of-band episode, we're bringing you the full interview with Lodrina Cherne, a Digital Forensics Expert, on Spyware : what is it, how it works, who sells it, and how you can avoid it yourself.

Nikita Kuzmin could have been a whiz programmer or a CEO of a successful startup. But as a teen in Moscow, he fell in with the wrong crowd, and his entrepreneurial skills found a different path: Gozi, the oddest and most brilliant malware operation ever conceived to that point in time.

Today's Cyber Stalkers have free access to almost government-grade spyware software with which they can terrorize their victims. Who's enabling the commercial spyware market?

Ran and Eliad Kimhi, one of the show's top producers, discuss the recent Listener's Survey results: what do like and dislike about the show, ideas you gave us for future improvements - and what do our listeners think about Ran's accent?...