Humankind on Public Radio
DavidFreudberg
Weekly podcast from public radio’s award-winning program Humankind
We consider the clash of science and ethics, based on a recently published history detailing how a notorious weapon, napalm, was developed at a major American university, with little concern for human consequences.

Having lost almost everything in the Madoff scam, best-selling author John Robbins tells how, in “an age of less,” he had to step back, reassess what’s important and build a new, more fulfilling life.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama is heard on Part 1 in a dialogue recorded at Harvard University.

It’s been said that we’ve learned how to speak but not necessarily how to communicate. Rarely are we taught the art of deep listening or how to respond to someone without accusation or blame or the ability to articulate our own needs without putting others on the defensive.

Bay Area physician and Univ. of California medical professor Martin Rossman, author of “The Worry Solution”, describes ways to distinguish between what we can change and what we must learn to accept.

The remarkable international effort to build “homes and hope” by marshalling the energies of young people, church communities and others, is described by Habitat for Humanity founder Millard Fuller.

Rev. Chris Antal, a Unitarian Universalist minister in the town of Rock Tavern, New York, was drawn to service in response to the attacks of 9/11. He entered military chaplaincy partially as a way to help soldiers who are prone to harming themselves in the wake of war. He also wanted to bring a “liberal voice into a very conservative chaplaincy,” consistent with the commitment of his tradition of acceptance for people representing different faiths and sexual orientation backgrounds. In this profile, Rev. Antal explores how he was drawn to faith-based engagement with indigenous religious leaders, where he was stationed at Kandahar Air Base.  “I was uniquely equipped to engage in interfaith dialogue” with Muslims. But what’s it like to be a spiritual presence in a war zone? What’s the duty to honor the lives of human beings who die in war, whether from your side or the “enemy”? Rev. Antal grew disenchanted with the U.S. military policy of deploying unmanned aircraft (drones), which are often associated with civilian casualties. In 2016, he resigned in protest from his commission as a chaplain in the Army Reserve and, after a Congressional inquiry, received an honorable discharge. We end this episode with an excerpt of Rev. Antal’s moving sermon about modern war.

We hear from chaplains and students on a college campus (Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennesee) with a long tradition of promoting dialogue among various groups. How can chaplains act as bridges between people of different traditions? What are the teachings of love for neighbor found all great religious philosophies? What can we learn from potentially rich exchanges honoring diversity? How can students be encouraged to ’stretch out’ and discover new truths. How can we face and mitigate the prejudices and preconceptions that most people carry with them? And what role can interfaith service activities play in breaking down barriers?

The United States incarcerates more people than any other nation in the world. Federal and state prisons and county jails hold around two million prisoners. Another five or so million people are on probation or parole. Some in this diverse population are dangerous and apparently don’t seek rehabilitation to a more productive life. For many others, though, incarceration is a forced opportunity for self-examination and positive change – a process that can be supported and stimulated by spiritual care providers. In this segment, we explore in-depth the experiences of two chaplains: Paul Shoaf-Kozak, a Christian social justice advocate who oversees the chaplaincy department at the Essex County Correctional Facility in Middleton, Massachusetts, northeast of Boston; and Genko Kathy Blackman, a Buddhist teacher who has long visited jails around the Seattle area. We also hear from two prisoners about their faith journeys while behind bars.

We visit a shelter at Seattle’s Mission for a rich exchange with a formerly homeless man who feels the spiritual care he received from mental health workers helped him develop the ability to transition into housing. We hear from a social worker, Larry Clum, who explores what it means to companion homeless people without an intent to “fix” their problem. Also, several chaplains reflect in-depth on the experience of connecting with people who are facing challenges related to mental health, addiction and homelessness. Included are comments by Kae Eaton of the Mental Health Chaplaincy, Rev. Jonathan Neufeld, community minister at Seattle Mennonite Church, and Rev. Beverly Hartz, with the Veterans Administration Puget Sound Health Care system.

David Freudberg, host of Humankind public radio, announces a new podcast on the fascinating practice of “spiritual care”: stories of caregivers (chaplains, nurses, social workers, etc) who provide nonsectarian support for people in need and sometimes in distress.

The new urban agriculture movement offers a way for us to re-connect our lives to nature

Which foods have the largest global warming footprint—and which are most climate-friendly?

Public school cafeterias are changing! We visit two in New England where recent policies reflect much greater attention to healthy meal options than were typically available in the past.

Hundreds of colleges are now moving toward healthier, more climate-friendly food choices on campus

A simple, 15-minute relaxation exercise.

Most people in metropolitan areas face choices when we travel -- to go by car or to use public transit? These decisions have a huge impact on our wallets, on the environment and on our quality of life. (Part 4)

Most people in metropolitan areas face choices when we travel -- to go by car or to use public transit? These decisions have a huge impact on our wallets, on the environment and on our quality of life. (Part 3)

Most people in metropolitan areas face choices when we travel -- to go by car or to use public transit? These decisions have a huge impact on our wallets, on the environment and on our quality of life. (Part 2)

Most people in metropolitan areas face choices when we travel -- to go by car or to use public transit? These decisions have a huge impact on our wallets, on the environment and on our quality of life. (Part 1)

We hear from veterans who wrestle with healing from “moral injury” which occurs after a violation of conscience, based on events they witnessed or participated in while on military duty.

We examine a fascinating new model of health care: integrative medicine. (Part 4)

In time for Veterans Day, we hear profiles of American soldiers who, after military duty, returned home to face another battle – the effects of Post- Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

We examine a fascinating new model of health care: integrative medicine. (Part 3)

We examine a fascinating new model of health care: integrative medicine. (Part 2)

We examine a fascinating new model of health care: integrative medicine. (Pt. 1)

A lively profile of "Granny D," (Mrs. Doris Haddock of Dublin, New Hampshire) famous for her 14-month walk across the United States to promote campaign finance reform. (Part 2)

A lively profile of "Granny D," (Mrs. Doris Haddock of Dublin, New Hampshire) famous for her 14-month walk across the United States to promote campaign finance reform. (Part 1)

A no-holds-barred look at the stressful conditions in which many nurses work: the long hours, the emotional toll, the rapid pace, and the way that technology and institutional practices can make it hard to form a caring bond with patients. (Part 4)

A no-holds-barred look at the stressful conditions in which many nurses work: the long hours, the emotional toll, the rapid pace, and the way that technology and institutional practices can make it hard to form a caring bond with patients. (Part 3)

The Power of Nonviolence seeks deep solutions to this vexing problem. We turn to wisdom teachings across our great spiritual traditions for guidance -- and inspiration -- on how the lasting wounds can be healed. (Part 6)

The Power of Nonviolence seeks deep solutions to this vexing problem. We turn to wisdom teachings across our great spiritual traditions for guidance -- and inspiration -- on how the lasting wounds can be healed. (Part 5)

This broadcast explores one of the most basic questions facing our democracy: who may participate? (Part 2)

This broadcast explores one of the most basic questions facing our democracy: who may participate? (Part 1)

Turning to wisdom teachings across our great spiritual traditions, we discover guidance -- and inspiration -- on how the lasting wounds can be healed. (Part 4)

In this episode of Humankind, we turn to wisdom teachings across our great spiritual traditions for guidance -- and inspiration -- on how the lasting wounds can be healed. (Part 3)

In this episode of Humankind, we turn to wisdom teachings across our great spiritual traditions for guidance -- and inspiration -- on how the lasting wounds can be healed. (Part 2)

In this episode of Humankind, we turn to wisdom teachings across our great spiritual traditions for guidance -- and inspiration -- on how the lasting wounds can be healed. (Part 1)

In this episode of Humankind, hear nuclear experts pro and con, an emergency room physician, and a variety of voices telling the story of a controversial reactor in Vermont. Part 1 of 2.

In this episode of Humankind, a no-holds-barred look at the stressful conditions in which many nurses work: the long hours, the emotional toll, the rapid pace, and the way that technology and institutional practices can make it hard to form a caring bond with patients.